This is just neat.

Google just launched Google Scholar, a search engine specifically for technical publications, books, and so on. It’s incredibly cool, and I didn’t work on this so I’m not personally biased. I’m mentioning this in a locked post since, even though we did publicly launch, I’m always a bit nervous about publicly discussing things.

But… try this out. It’s not just hard sciences and medicine; the social sciences are in there, too.

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Published in: on November 18, 2004 at 11:15  Comments (16)  
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16 Comments

  1. Oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo! SHINY!

  2. Oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo! SHINY!

  3. Ooooooooh! Just in time for my term papers! Woohooo!!!!!
    *happy dance*

  4. Ooooooooh! Just in time for my term papers! Woohooo!!!!!
    *happy dance*

  5. Cool. I can research my favorite post-Soviet entities without wading through their partisans’ Geocities pages.
    That may not sound like a big deal, but it’s enormous.

  6. Cool. I can research my favorite post-Soviet entities without wading through their partisans’ Geocities pages.
    That may not sound like a big deal, but it’s enormous.

  7. Neat. What sort of searches are you doing?

  8. Neat. What sort of searches are you doing?

  9. YES! I’ve been using scirus for these kinds of searches, but this is great!

  10. YES! I’ve been using scirus for these kinds of searches, but this is great!

  11. Sweet. Talk about timing, putting this up 3 weeks before finals/term papers…
    Looks like it’s at least as good as the non-pay pubmed.:) Going on my list of how to research bio stuff…

  12. Sweet. Talk about timing, putting this up 3 weeks before finals/term papers…
    Looks like it’s at least as good as the non-pay pubmed.:) Going on my list of how to research bio stuff…

  13. I tested it by searching for Dniester (aka Transdniestria and many alternate spellings) and Abkhazia. The Dniestrians are the worst for crappy Geocities pages. They’re a heavily Russian sliver of mostly Romanian Moldova, a holdover from the days of Bessarabia, I think.
    Abkhazia, a spin-off of the Republic of Georgia, is where the action is these days. They fought to secede from Georgia in the early 90’s, and they’ve maintained a sort of de-facto independence under Russian protection ever since. Now there’s a disputed election, with the Russians starting to rumble about protecting their interests.
    The Caucasus region sees the interaction of three important conflicts, I think: the Russian question, pipelines for Caspian oil (and to some extent, control of the oil itself), and Islamic resurgence. All crucial, but the Russian question is coming to the fore. I think they have to start expanding, or they’ll continue to contract. They’re in danger of losing Chechnya, and the whole Caucasus by extension. Not only does this threaten their Black Sea access (already in question in the current Ukrainian elections), but if they have to fall back from the Caucasus, there aren’t many natural borders until you reach Moscow.
    This new Google gizmo isn’t much for news, of course, but I found what looked like interesting background info. For news on these conflicts, see an old post of mine.
    Now I’m just rambling while I wait for my meeeting to start. Livejournal good. Meetings bad.

  14. I tested it by searching for Dniester (aka Transdniestria and many alternate spellings) and Abkhazia. The Dniestrians are the worst for crappy Geocities pages. They’re a heavily Russian sliver of mostly Romanian Moldova, a holdover from the days of Bessarabia, I think.
    Abkhazia, a spin-off of the Republic of Georgia, is where the action is these days. They fought to secede from Georgia in the early 90’s, and they’ve maintained a sort of de-facto independence under Russian protection ever since. Now there’s a disputed election, with the Russians starting to rumble about protecting their interests.
    The Caucasus region sees the interaction of three important conflicts, I think: the Russian question, pipelines for Caspian oil (and to some extent, control of the oil itself), and Islamic resurgence. All crucial, but the Russian question is coming to the fore. I think they have to start expanding, or they’ll continue to contract. They’re in danger of losing Chechnya, and the whole Caucasus by extension. Not only does this threaten their Black Sea access (already in question in the current Ukrainian elections), but if they have to fall back from the Caucasus, there aren’t many natural borders until you reach Moscow.
    This new Google gizmo isn’t much for news, of course, but I found what looked like interesting background info. For news on these conflicts, see an old post of mine.
    Now I’m just rambling while I wait for my meeeting to start. Livejournal good. Meetings bad.

  15. Looks like it’s at least as good as the non-pay pubmed.:)

    It had better be, it includes it.

  16. Looks like it’s at least as good as the non-pay pubmed.:)

    It had better be, it includes it.


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