Some reading material for a long Monday

From Aviation Week: Secret two-stage-to-orbit plane program ends. I’d say it’s pretty likely that these rumors are legit, and if so… damn, that’s a beautiful bit of design. I wish we could reuse it (well, minus the use of insanely toxic fuels) for civilian purposes.

From Seed: A great article on Elizabeth Gould’s research on neurogenesis and stress.

From Philip Greenspun: An interesting article on why there aren’t so many women in science, which basically raises the question of why anyone would be in science. There’s stuff to think about in there…

And if you’re really bored, my own post from a few days ago with more politics stuff. I should really know better than to post long essays over the weekend…

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Published in: on March 6, 2006 at 17:26  Comments (6)  
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6 Comments

  1. My question for Philip Greenspun: Supposing that your theory is correct and women are, in general, choosing higher-paying career paths, why are there so few female computer scientists and mechanical and electrical engineers?
    Sorry. I’m just not buying it.

  2. My question for Philip Greenspun: Supposing that your theory is correct and women are, in general, choosing higher-paying career paths, why are there so few female computer scientists and mechanical and electrical engineers?
    Sorry. I’m just not buying it.

  3. Yes… I don’t think the article really explained anything about gender differences at all. It was a pretty good explanation of why working in academia is a pain in the ass, but that’s about it.

  4. Yes… I don’t think the article really explained anything about gender differences at all. It was a pretty good explanation of why working in academia is a pain in the ass, but that’s about it.

  5. I read the earlier post and appreciated it even if I did not have any useful comments to bring to it. I really appreciate your periodic updates: I basically live under a rock as far as knowledge of current events go, so having intelligent, broad-overview commentary on these sorts of things on my friends-list by someone whose intellect and sincerity I trust (i.e. I am not wondering, “Is this worth my time to read? What assumptions do I need to make about the agenda of the author?”) is very good.

  6. I read the earlier post and appreciated it even if I did not have any useful comments to bring to it. I really appreciate your periodic updates: I basically live under a rock as far as knowledge of current events go, so having intelligent, broad-overview commentary on these sorts of things on my friends-list by someone whose intellect and sincerity I trust (i.e. I am not wondering, “Is this worth my time to read? What assumptions do I need to make about the agenda of the author?”) is very good.


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